RBS Tower composite at dusk

IMG_0371 comp2 sm

An image composed of two framings. One for the lower (exterior) portion (two exposures – the first includes pedestrians on left side and far right, the second for the traffic trails). The other is a composite of 7 exposures for the upper floors, showing the people framed by the windows over a 20 minute period, as they pack up at the end of the working day (4.40 – 5pm).

The location is the Royal Bank of Scotland building on Deansgate, Manchester

New book published

I’ve just got my copy of Park Hill: Streets in the Sky, a Dozen Perspectives published by FutureHeritage

http://www.futureheritage.org.uk/parkhill/

12 photographers photographed the enormous Park Hill housing complex in Sheffield on the same day. The book draws together different perspectives on this early post-war deck access development (now a listed structure).

A couple of my images that feature in the book are below

DerekT3 DerekT1

Just registered for four events at ‘The Liveable City – a Danish-British Dialogue in Manchester’

See the registration page on the Danish Embassy’s website:
http://storbritannien.um.dk/en/about%20great%20britain/the-liveable-city—a-danish-british-dialogue-in-manchester/the-liveable-city-programme/

I’ve signed up for the…

Urban Planning seminar

Screening of The Human Scale

Mending Modernism

and Contemporary use of Historic Structures

Source references with citations: paper presentation in Berlin 30/10/2014

And Yet Still, it Moves.

References for conference presentation Berlin 30th October 2014
Derek Trillo MA ARPS

‘[architectural photography]…the craven image, a lifeless piece of flattering deception foisted on an unsuspecting public by an unholy alliance of architect, photographer and art editor’ (Elwall 1991 quoting Tom Picton, p 63)

Reference to Tom Gunning’s ongoing dialogue with the ‘truth claim’ of photography:
To represent “truth”, it must resemble the object it represents, which is not an inevitable characteristic of an index. (Gunning 2004)

”…photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing, and when they have vanished, there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again,” (Bourdieu 1996, p 136, paraphrasing Henri Cartier-Bresson)

‘…in order to catch another layer of reality and not to render the real idealistic.’ (Meireis 2012).

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Fifth International Conference on the Image, Berlin 29-30 October 2014

I’ve just applied to present a paper at this conference – the abstract is below:

Yet Still, it Moves: How Can Still Images Represent a Temporal World? 

This paper challenges the notion that photography can best fulfil Gunning’s ‘Truth claim’ when produced by instantaneous capture. In our temporal world, experiences are not constrained to single moments in time, ‘decisive’ or otherwise. Continually evolving, multiple perceptions form experiences, modify memories and inspire imagination.

Henri Bergson’s philosophy was grounded in the idea that thinking dominated by spatial metaphors is a category error, because temporality is crucial to our understanding of lived experience.

The paper critiques conventional architectural photography, a profession in which images attempt to arrest time at a building’s completion, portraying them as pristine, lifeless shells. I contrast this with my own practice: multiple digital images, reconstituted into single frames. Intended to inform both architectural design and research, this practice builds on the lived experience of architecture, expressed as an accumulation of encounters.

I argue that, contrary to established opinion, constructed images using digital technologies present a credible alternative, albeit a mediated one. This methodology elaborates on Bergson’s understanding of temporality and Deleuze’s concepts of experiential time. Lying on the indistinct boundary between still and moving images, my practice is informed by Kracauer’s ‘flow of life’,referring to cinema’s ability, over stills, to capture the essence of life.